Would you spend $400 on a shower head?

Probably not. But this isn’t any ordinary shower head — this is a Nebia, a shower system that’s been backed by some pretty powerful players, including startup seed fund Y Combinator, Google chairman Eric Schmidt’s Family Foundation, and even Apple CEO Tim Cook, who was the company’s first angel investor.

Nebia’s Kickstarter page for the shower head went live on Monday night. And as of Tuesday evening, it’s soared past its $100,000 goal, raking in north of $730,000 from over 2,000 backers.

Nebia CEO Philip Winter explained why the Nebia shower head is so special in its Kickstarter video and in an interview with Venturebeat.

Nebia cofounder Carlos Gomez Andonaegui was concerned that his fitness club was using too much water. So he and his father Emilio set out to find a solution.

Nebia cofounder Carlos Gomez Andonaegui was concerned that his fitness club was using too much water. So he and his father Emilio set out to find a solution. Kickstarter/Nebia
Together with Philip Winter, the team spent five years working on dozens of prototypes to make a more efficient shower head.

Together with Philip Winter, the team spent five years working on dozens of prototypes to make a more efficient shower head.

Nebia says over 500 people have tried its shower head, including Tim Cook and Eric Schmidt.

Nebia says over 500 people have tried its shower head, including Tim Cook and Eric Schmidt.

Nebia uses advanced nozzle technologies to change the size and distribution of water droplets, atomizing streams of water into millions of tiny droplets to cover a much larger surface area at a fraction of the volume.

Nebia uses advanced nozzle technologies to change the size and distribution of water droplets, atomizing streams of water into millions of tiny droplets to cover a much larger surface area at a fraction of the volume.

Americans take roughly eight minutes to shower, on average. With a traditional shower, that’s over 20 gallons of water. With Nebia, it’s only 6 gallons — that’s 70% less water.

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